Delivering outcomes for customers

Smart Places have the customer at the centre and deliver benefits for citizens, businesses and communities. In this section, you will learn more about the outcomes that will be delivered.

In this section:

Smart Places have the customer at the centre

The NSW Government is ensuring Smart Places are designed to deliver outcomes to benefit our citizens, businesses, employees and partners. The outcomes span six key areas and were developed using insights from our engagement with communities across regional and metropolitan NSW. These outcomes will be used to assess the performance of  future smart initiatives developed by the NSW Government and our partners.

These outcomes will be used to assess the performance of future smart initiatives developed by the NSW Government and our partners.

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Skills, Jobs and Development

Smart Places grow knowledge capital of people and businesses in NSW to benefit from the transition of the global economy.

Measurable benefits for our communities

Fast, reliable and dedicated communications networks are essential components of a Smart City and drive economic growth. The Ten Gigabit Adelaide project is delivering a 10Gbps fibre optic network – among the fastest internet connectivity speeds in the world – to 1,000 buildings throughout the Adelaide CBD and along the main commercial strips in North Adelaide. The project will:

  • provide the fundamental infrastructure needed to deliver a range of smart city projects and services.
  • create up to 2,500 new jobs in the first six years by helping retain and attract new businesses, entrepreneurs, government and institutions.
  • generate up to $76 million in economic benefits per annum.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Provide open data to generate new insights and opportunities for businesses and government to innovate in the delivery of services and infrastructure.
  • Use data and smart solutions to improve efficiency in the design, approvals, delivery, maintenance and decommissioning of assets and places.
  • Increase digital literacy and capability of customers to improve their access to economic opportunities.
  • Invest in human capital across NSW Government and Councils to help deliver Smart Places and solutions.
  • Strengthen a culture of trialing new approaches, technologies and procurement methods.

Leverage and multiply economic opportunities in key strategic places in our cities and regional centres through investment in smart places.

Where this is already being done

Transport for NSW’s Future Transport Digital Accelerator connects customers and NSW Government with industry, researchers, entrepreneurs and start-ups in the digital space. The Accelerator uses a humancentred design approach to gather research, develop crucial insights and deliver products and services to market by partnering and co-designing with the technology and innovation sector. This increases Government’s capabilities and ensures better, more customer-centric outcomes.

The NSW Government is developing the Sydney Innovation and Technology Precinct - a place where ambitious startups, world-class universities and research institutions, high‑tech giants and the community collaborate to solve problems, socialise and spark ideas that change our world. This globally connected precinct, expected to generate 25,000 jobs, will be underpinned by high-quality physical and digital infrastructure, attracting the brightest and the best to Sydney, establishing an ambitious benchmark for generations to come.

Safety and Security

Smart Places provide safer places for our people and increase our sense of security.

Measurable benefits for our communities

Smart CCTV, smart lighting, speakers, predictive analytics and ‘push to talk’ emergency systems can help make public spaces safer and reduce crime. Broken Hill City Council aims to see a 20% reduction in crime following the installation of smart safety technology. The Smart Western City Program Strategic Business Case predicts a 26% reduction in non-domestic related assaults as a result of the deployment of these types of smart solutions.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Ensure data from customers and places is collected and used to maintain both value, privacy and security.
  • Increase people’s sense of safety, so they can fully participate in the social and economic activities at all times of day.
  • Increase the social resilience of customers and communities that use Smart Places.
  • Increase the safety and security of customers moving to, from and within Smart Places.
  • Increase the resilience of physical and digital assets to natural and human threats.
  • Increase the security of physical and digital infrastructure in Smart Places from cyber attacks.

Where this is already been done

The Smart Places Strategy commits the NSW Government to developing a Data Protection Policy and a Customer Charter for Smart Places. These are critical foundations for the success of Smart Places and will guide how data from Smart Places is collected, managed and stored.

The NSW Telco Authority is rolling out the Critical Communication and Enhancement Program, an upgrade to the Government’s Radio Network. The program involves integrating the separate radio networks for first responders and essential service agencies into one shared network more easily communicate information (interoperability) and coordinate responses during critical incidents. The program also increases the coverage of the network with new telecommunication infrastructure in our regional and metropolitan areas. This increases the safety, security and resilience of our communities and provided valuable support during the 2019/20 bushfire season.

Environmental Quality

Smart Places increase our sustainability by reducing emissions, resource consumption and environmenal impacts.

Measurable benefits for our communities

Smart meters allow residents and businesses to track their water and energy usage and be alerted in real-time via smart phones or tablets. By responding to real time alerts, people can save money by reducing water consumption by up to 20 to 30%. The Smart Western City Program Strategic Business Case assumes water use can be reduced by 22.5%, translating directly to water bill savings for customers.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Provide customers realtime access to information to help them better manage their consumption and resource use.
  • Improve the monitoring and forecasting of environmental conditions, to assist action in real time.
  • Incorporate environmental sensors into new and improved infrastructure assets.
  • Improve the efficiency of resource use and waste generation by using smart initiatives to monitor assets across their whole life and encourage their re-use.
  • Improve and maintain the health of the natural and built environment in Smart Places.
  • Adopt smart solutions to more efficiently use our services and infrastructure to reduce carbon emissions.

Where this is already being done

Georges River Council’s Cool Places Urban Oasis Program delivered open-air community ChillOUT hubs at three local parks, rolling out IoT environmental sensors to measure urban heat microclimates, mobile charging stations that integrate with furniture, Wi-Fi access points, and flexible work and rest spaces. The program provided the community places and infrastructure that are people‑friendly, increase liveability and combat urban heat island effects.

In 2019, Barangaroo was announced as the first urban precinct in Australia to be awarded carbon neutral status. The carbon neutral certification, awarded by the Commonwealth Government, was achieved by taking three approaches to carbon emissions – ‘avoid, reduce, mitigate’. The approach integrates environmentally sustainable measures implemented within each building and across the precinct overall and is supported by smart technology.

Equity, Accessibility and Inclusion

Smart Places will improve physical and digital access for the people of NSW to participate in economic and civic life.

Measurable benefits for our communities

Real-time route planning for vehicles, sensor networks on parking spots and smart traffic signalling can contribute to managing congestion and improve mobility options. Technology like this has been shown to reduce commute times by 15 to 20 per cent, giving people back time in their day. The Smart Western City Program Strategic Business Case assumes people will be able to cut their travel times by 5.5% with smart transport technologies.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Increase fixed and wireless digital coverage, connectivity and quality across NSW.
  • Use data insights and smart technologies to improve physical and digital accessibility across NSW.
  • Introduce smart solutions to convey the history and culture of the place, including recognition of the traditional owners.
  • Increase community pride, empowerment and cultural bonds to improve social cohesion and social isolation.
  • Increase connected public spaces to allow people to work and study in more places, boosting access to education and income opportunities.
  • Increase participation in local and digital economies of a place.

Where this is already being done

The NSW Government has committed $400 million to bring a faster and more reliable digital network to regional NSW. The Regional Digital Connectivity program will ensure families and businesses across regional NSW have better access to enjoy mobile, internet and digital services. The program is focused on eliminating mobile black spots where people live and work, bringing metro-level data speeds, connectivity and infrastructure to regional NSW, and supporting agribusiness and agricultural technology.

Barangaroo Ngangamay is a unique and authentic Aboriginal cultural experience, using modern technology to tell ancient stories of the world’s oldest living culture. This innovative multimedia artwork is embedded within the iconic Sydney sandstone of Barangaroo Reserve, honours and brings to life the significance of Barangaroo the woman, after whom this part of Sydney’s western waterfront is named. Five rock engravings have been hand-carved into five sandstone rocks around Barangaroo Reserve by male Aboriginal Elders using manual hand tools such as stones, mallets and chisels. The engravings act as a key to unlock five short films depicting the life cycles of the sun, moon and women. Each film is accessible to visitors through their smart phone or tablet using a geo-location app, which plays the films when approaching the engravings.

Health and Well-being

Smart Places improve the quality of life and well-being for the people of NSW.

Measurable benefits for our communities

The NSW Government is assessing smart technology start-ups that monitor and model air quality, climate conditions and other real-time environmental data. These have the potential to reduce health impacts from severe environmental conditions such as extreme heat, poor air quality, and high pollination events on the most vulnerable members of the community. The Smart Western City Program Strategic Business Case reflects these benefits and assumes smart technologies will help us reduce asthma-related hospital admissions by 5%.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Integrate smart technology to inform the design and maintenance of shared, bike and pedestrian paths to encourage physical activity.
  • Use smart solutions to make public spaces safe and encourage their use at all times of the day.
  • Improve the ability to provide real time data on environmental risk factors that affect health and well‑being of customers.
  • Invest in health data as an asset to inform health education, program delivery and service provision in our healthcare system.
  • Improve digital connectivity to enable the provision health care services in regional and remote locations.
  • Deploy smart technology to make places adaptable to changing community needs.

Where this is already being done

As part of the Commonwealth Government’s Smart Cities and Suburbs Program, the City of Sydney rolled out walking sensors across the local government area to collect pedestrian movements at a large scale. Data was made publically available and allowed for evidence‑based decisions for future investment to encourage active transport, enhance pedestrian infrastructure, safety improvements, waste collection, city maintenance, late‑night activity areas, and event planning.

A new, “virtual hospital” is being trialled in metropolitan Sydney. Patients choosing to enrol have access to 24/7 personalised healthcare in the home. Through a smart device, they can contact a nurse and record and update their health information. Virtual hospitals combine the delivery of community healthcare services with the latest digital healthcare strategies. This new, innovative way of caring - with the patient at the centre - allows local health districts to provide enhanced multidisciplinary services to the community. This has the potential to reduce unnecessary Emergency Department presentations, shorten a patient’s length of stay in hospital and empower patients to lead a better quality of life.

Collaboration and Connection

Smart Places bring people, businesses and governments, their data and services together in a seamless way.

Measurable benefits for our communities

To drive innovation and explore market possibilities - the Smart Western City Program is being co-created with industry through an early market engagement program. Industry were asked to present technological innovation opportunities to improve productivity, sustainability and social outcomes for the Western Parkland City. 114 prospectuses were received in response to a call for ideas, and around 80 organisations participated in market sounding activities and included a pitchfest event which led to a number of test and trials.

Achieving this outcome

Smart Places initiatives being developed by the NSW Government and partners should:

  • Establish new partnership models for deeper collaboration between partners, Government and communities, enabling services to be joined seamlessly.
  • Provide consistent platforms for data storage and management for appropriate data to be shared openly.
  • Drive adoption of new technologies and approaches by engaging communities early, so the solutions are relevant to the place.
  • Encourage data-driven solutions in partnership with the academic sector and industry.
  • Ensure digitally-enabled environments are adaptable and resilient to future technological change.
  • Ensure quality data is collected from all sources with permission from data owners.

Where is this already being done

New health care facilities rely heavily on the expert input of clinicians and other health care professionals during design. For the $740 million Liverpool Health and Academic Precinct, NSW Health Infrastructure piloted a Virtual Reality (VR) experience to enhance the design process. Users accessed interactive VR environments to explore their clinical areas in the design stage, a step-change from the usual technique of reviewing 2D drawings, design data sheets and static 3D images.

Digital Engineering is the convergence of technologies to create a digital model of an infrastructure asset over its entire life. By digitally connecting and integrating the different systems used within each stage, and throughout the life of an infrastructure asset, significant construction and operational costs can be saved. The Digital Built NSW program aims to capture these interoperability benefits by rolling this out across the NSW Government’s infrastructure program. The program has found that construction costs could be reduced by up to 10% and whole of life asset management costs by up to 5%.

Implementing Smart Places >